Kicking the Procrastination Habit

Most people, at some point or another, find themselves deep in procrastination mode. It’s so common that it even has its own week: National Procrastination Week is March 4-10, 2018. For some, we procrastinate with mindless escapes such as cat videos and online games. Others engage in procrastination by taking on productive tasks such as cleaning the refrigerator, reorganizing the closet, or responding to emails.

Sometimes we procrastinate to avoid an unpleasant task or conversation. Sometimes we don’t know how to get started or we are daunted by the feeling that the task is just too big. For some people, the fear of failing or not being perfect causes them to push the task off until they feel more prepared. Whatever the reason, and reasons are unique to each of us and each situation, here are a few things you can do to address procrastination in your life.

Awareness

One of the very first steps to putting an end to procrastination is to recognize that you are doing it. It’s pretty easy to recognize that we are procrastinating when we have spent the last hour watching dance videos from the 80’s. However, it can be hard to do – especially if you are someone who procrastinates by starting other productive projects instead of tackling that daunting task.

If you are a list-maker, be mindful of how you are picking and choosing the activities to start. Has that one task been on your list for the past 3 days? Are you, all of a sudden, getting a whole lot crossed off your list? Could this be because you are avoiding one particular task?

Bring attention to your emotional reaction to thoughts about the work you have to accomplish. Sometimes we “create priorities” that push the unpleasant task off until the next day. Sometimes, you may notice a brief feeling of anxiety or guilt when you think about a project that you have not started yet.

Forgiveness

Once you recognize that you are pushing a task down the road, acknowledge it. Do so without beating yourself up about it. Don’t add more stress to the situation with negative self-talk. Acknowledge it and move to the next step.

Reflect

Attempt to identify what it is about the task that is challenging you. In reality – that is the issue that you need to address, not the procrastination. Procrastination is like a symptom of something deeper that you may need to resolve.

Take an honest look at the reasons you are avoiding the task. If you need support, talk with a trusted friend or mentor. They can ask you reflective questions that might help you shed light on why you are avoiding the task.

Create a realistic plan

Your plan needs to be specific to the reason that you identified for the procrastination. Each situation may have a different reason, especially if you are an experienced procrastinator.

Here are a few general plans – but you will have to create a plan that works best for you:

  • If the job is too big – Break the job down into small segments and assign due dates for each segment. If you find that you are still procrastinating, either do more reflection or break the segments down into even smaller pieces.
  • If you are afraid of failing – evaluate your relationship with failure. Failure is an important learning opportunity. It can teach us many things, including how to adapt our actions in the future. Recognize that there is no such thing as perfection.
  • If you resent having to complete the task – resentment arises when we don’t feel in control of the decision to complete the task. This can occur when the task is a job responsibility or when we have agreed to do something that we don’t really want to do.
    • Job responsibility – it may help to recognize how the task fits into the overall success of the program. Try to focus on the contribution you are making as you complete the task.
    • You agreed to take on the task – you have made a commitment and should honor it. You could ask that someone else be assigned the task, but consider your future relationship with the task organizer. You may need to work through this one last task, but moving forward, carefully consider tasks before accepting them. If you are not completely passionate about the task, say NO!
  • If you aren’t feeling inspired– when waiting for inspiration, you may find yourself in a chicken-or-egg situation. Sometimes getting started, even in the smallest manner, produces inspiration.
  • If it’s not really important anymore – reevaluate your goals and the reasons that you have this task on your list in the first place. Perhaps you want to take an exercise class, but seem to find other more important things to do instead. Revisit why you had the original desire to take the class. List the benefits would you feel from the class and your long term health goals. Find a friend who might go with you or help you maintain accountability. You have to take care of yourself in order to take care of others!

ChildCare Education Institute Announces Partnership with Association of Childhood Education International


ChildCare Education Institute (CCEI), a nationally accredited and IACET approved distance training institution dedicated exclusively to the child care industry, is proud to announce an agreement with the Association of Childhood Education International (ACEI) to offer online training and certificate programs of study.

The partnership with ACEI recognizes CCEI as the preferred provider of online early childhood development programs. ACEI members will be able to enroll in CCEI courses through a custom-designed ACEI online portal. This co-branded portal provides members with user-friendly enrollment, which allows them to access competency-based, self-paced, online coursework on popular child care training topics.

“Partnerships like this one are implemented to further the common goal of preparing the child care workforce to provide the best educational and developmental opportunities for young children. Educators can continue to broaden their skill set, advance their careers and maintain a life-work balance by enrolling in online professional development or certificate programs with CCEI,” said Maria C. Taylor, ChildCare Education Institute President and CEO.

ChildCare Education Institute Offers No-Cost Online Course Examining The Read Aloud Process: Building the Components of Literacy

ChildCare Education Institute® (CCEI), an online child care training provider dedicated exclusively to the early care and education workforce, offers LIT101: The Read Aloud Process: Building The Components of Literacy as a no-cost trial course to new CCEI users February 1-28, 2018.

There are many facts with regard to building literacy and reading skills, and we learn more through research and practice every day. One thing we know for sure is that not all children come to kindergarten with the same skills, experiences, or background knowledge. We know there are social and cultural forces at play, such as the fact that children with highly educated parents tend to develop language and literacy skills more readily, not because of genetic factors but simply because of the kinds of learning experiences and the sheer number of words they are more likely to encounter during early childhood.  One of the jobs of an early childhood educator is to teach children the pre-reading and reading skills necessary to succeed in school and life.

During early childhood, it is more important to focus on the characteristics of fluent readers, not just which letters make which sounds. With that in mind, read−alouds provide an essential tool for promoting essential early literacy skills.  What do young children need in order to build literacy skills? They need read−alouds! This is true up through preschool, kindergarten, and grades 1–3, at least, if not well beyond. Indeed, students should continue “shared readings” throughout their middle school and into the high school years.

This course is about the preparation and skills a teacher needs in order to ensure that read-alouds in the early childhood environment accomplish the literacy-building goals of a good early childhood curriculum. This course is about the process of conducting effective, meaningful read-alouds in order to build foundational literacy skills that children will use for the rest of their lives.

“While read-alouds are a staple in any effective, high-quality early learning program, teachers do not always take advantage of all the ways in which the read-aloud can build essential early literacy skills,” says Maria C. Taylor, President and CEO of CCEI.  “A well-planned read-aloud should provide far more than exposure to a good story; through rich, meaningful discussion and related activities, young children should be able to build comprehension and analytical skills as well as background knowledge that will be so important as they develop into independent readers.”

LIT101: The Read Aloud Process: Building The Components of Literacy is a one-hour, intermediate-level course and grants 0.1 IACET CEU upon successful completion. Current CCEI users with active, unlimited annual subscriptions can register for professional development courses at no additional cost when logged in to their CCEI account. Users without subscriptions can purchase child care training courses as block hours through CCEI online enrollment.

For more information, visit www.cceionline.com or call 1.800.499.9907, prompt 3, Monday – Friday, 8 a.m. – 5 p.m. EST

ChildCare Education Institute, LLC

ChildCare Education Institute® provides high-quality, distance education certificates and child care training programs in an array of child care settings, including preschool centers, family child care, prekindergarten classrooms, nanny care, online daycare training and more. Over 100 English and Spanish child care training courses are available online to meet licensing, recognition program, and Head Start Requirements. CCEI also has online certification programs that provide the coursework requirement for national credentials including the CDA, Director and Early Childhood Credentials.  CCEI, a Council for Professional Recognition CDA Gold Standard™ training provider, is nationally accredited by the Distance Education Accrediting Commission (DEAC), is accredited as an Authorized Provider by the International Association for Continuing Education and Training (IACET), and is authorized under the Nonpublic Postsecondary Educational Institutions Act of 1990, license number 837.

ChildCare Education Institute Offers No-Cost Online Course Examining The Read Aloud Process: Building the Components of Literacy

ChildCare Education Institute® (CCEI), an online child care training provider dedicated exclusively to the early care and education workforce, offers LIT101: The Read Aloud Process: Building The Components of Literacy as a no-cost trial course to new CCEI users February 1-28, 2018.

There are many facts with regard to building literacy and reading skills, and we learn more through research and practice every day. One thing we know for sure is that not all children come to kindergarten with the same skills, experiences, or background knowledge. We know there are social and cultural forces at play, such as the fact that children with highly educated parents tend to develop language and literacy skills more readily, not because of genetic factors but simply because of the kinds of learning experiences and the sheer number of words they are more likely to encounter during early childhood. One of the jobs of an early childhood educator is to teach children the pre-reading and reading skills necessary to succeed in school and life.

During early childhood, it is more important to focus on the characteristics of fluent readers, not just which letters make which sounds. With that in mind, read−alouds provide an essential tool for promoting essential early literacy skills. What do young children need in order to build literacy skills? They need read−alouds! This is true up through preschool, kindergarten, and grades 1–3, at least, if not well beyond. Indeed, students should continue “shared readings” throughout their middle school and into the high school years.

This course is about the preparation and skills a teacher needs in order to ensure that read-alouds in the early childhood environment accomplish the literacy-building goals of a good early childhood curriculum. This course is about the process of conducting effective, meaningful read-alouds in order to build foundational literacy skills that children will use for the rest of their lives.

“While read-alouds are a staple in any effective, high-quality early learning program, teachers do not always take advantage of all the ways in which the read-aloud can build essential early literacy skills,” says Maria C. Taylor, President and CEO of CCEI. “A well-planned read-aloud should provide far more than exposure to a good story; through rich, meaningful discussion and related activities, young children should be able to build comprehension and analytical skills as well as background knowledge that will be so important as they develop into independent readers.”

LIT101: The Read Aloud Process: Building The Components of Literacy is a one-hour, intermediate-level course and grants 0.1 IACET CEU upon successful completion. Current CCEI users with active, unlimited annual subscriptions can register for professional development courses at no additional cost when logged in to their CCEI account. Users without subscriptions can purchase child care training courses as block hours through CCEI online enrollment.

For more information, visit www.cceionline.edu or call 1.800.499.9907, prompt 3, Monday – Friday, 8 a.m. – 5 p.m. EST